Gallatin Arts Festival 2011

4/4/2011 – 4/10/2011, Main Gallery, 4th and 5th floors

Statement

The Gallatin Arts Fest focuses on acknowledging and encouraging artistic practice as an integral pat of intellectual growth. This year’s show attempts to not only emphasize the creative rigor of its participants, but also express the heterogeneity of ideas and processes embraced by students at the school. It is not a singular idea that binds these works together. Instead, their relations to each other in a shared space make this exhibition stimulating and uniquely reflective of the Gallatin experience. We invite the viewer to create his or her own approach to the works on display, finding the common themes that run between these pieces and engaging in the interdisciplinary diologue that these works have already started.

-Nina Culotta and Arianna Plevisani

 

Jackson Bishop

Statement

C’EST MOI.This piece was originally designed as a sticker to be placed over model’s faces in clothing advertisements to address the false nature of consumer culture and statments like “diamonds are forever” in the face of our own human mortality. Recently, it has operated outside of this definition, placed in pubilc spaces by the artist for its’ aesthetic appeal.

Bio

Jackson is a Sophomore at Gallatin. His interests lie in Language (French/Spanish), design, music, and international affair. His artwork seeks to enliven and diversify the public space and the physical structure of his surroundings.

Winston Chmielinksi

Statement

STORIES. I apply pigment to dust and people still ask why the paint’s falling apart. The intention was never to create something solid, but built upon my own body I guess it misled; one can imagine these, then, as the quilted skins of others, a slick parachuted sheen against a picture perfect sky, set afire simply for yellows and reds and ash-rimmed circles of blue.

Bio

Winston Chmielinski went by “Will” for a year when he was teased, once, for having the name of a cigarette and “someone probably really nerdy.” But when he considered the unfair expectation for Wills to find their ways, Winston reassumed the only name well-suited to the smoke-ring trajectory of isolated in-the-studio roundabouts and repetitions. [Winston Chmielinski hails from Boston, MA, and is currently a senior in Gallatin with a concentration in Utopianism/ Narcissism.]

Hannah Daly

Statement

In a wholly digitalized and globalized world, what does being at an event, in a moment, really mean? IF ONLY YOU KNEW is a performative installation that contemplates the dissolution of the event. I have asked people to participate in a moment stripped down to its core—this awkward and uncomfortable moment spotlighted. I have collapsed an event into a stacatto isolation to force us to think about what it means to be there. We can Skype, Twitter, or phone in to a place thousands of miles and time zones away; what does this mean for how we relate to each other in a shared space?

Bio

Hannah Daly is critic, curator, and creator. She is a Gallatin senior pursuing a concentration entitled “Race, Space + Visual Culture,” with a minor in Africana Studies. Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Daly currently lives and works in Brooklyn. Her work attempts to engage with questions of space, place, new racial politics, celebrity, digital culture and transnational cultural flow, all in the hopes of upsetting the politics of comfort and starting a new dialogue

Hayden Dunham

Statement

UNTIL IT’S ALL GONE uses products associated with feminine power to create a natural space for humans and animals to be quiet in. With this installation I am interested in taking hair out of drains and off of razors and placing it into a visible space that is both nurturing and warm.

Bio

Hayden Dunham is a person who makes things for real and imaginary people. Her work tends to address issues around power structures, animal needs, uncomfortable feelings and alternative reality solutions. She lives and works in Brooklyn

Jacob Goldman

Statement

NO COUNTENANCE originated under the auspices of the Emerging Jewish Artist Fellowship, sponsored by the Bronfman Center at NYU. My trip to Auschwitz and Birkenau at 10 years old has been my guide for the piece, as I aim to remove the distance caused by reflective thought and retrieve my youthful emotions.

Bio

Jacob Goldman is a sophomore at Gallatin. He was born and raised in New Haven, Connecticut, alongside his brother, sister, and a few pairs of Bernese Mountain Dogs. He studies music with Joan La Barbara.

Tina Gong

Statement

CELL is an attempt to represent birth from two contrasting perspectives: the first is scientific and microscopic, represented through the process of mitosis. The second is religious and macroscopic, as depicted through the seven days of genesis. This series of images simultaneously goes through both these events in order to reflect upon the concept of repeating forms and relationships. Although these ideas are revealed to us through different surface structures, they stem from a single root: the act of creation. By naming a particular instance of mitosis, one also calls upon the general archetype of genesis, so that each gains clarification and fulfillment in the other, in the moment that either one is spoken

Bio

Tina Gong is a graduating senior at Gallatin concentrating in pattern formation. Though a native New Yorker, she is surprisingly incompetent at introducing herself. This knack is exceptionally evident in situations where the introduction is to be closely associated with projects that she holds dear, such as artwork. Wielding ballpoint pens and markers, she attempts to represent complex themes like spirituality, science, identity and myth in her work, even though she is embarrassed by their content. Unfortunately, this discomfort renders her completely and utterly incapable of expressing their origins and intent in language. So, in the end, she just likes to make pretty pictures. Hooray.

Sarah Hingley

Statement

Light has played an essential role throughout the development of society. Natural sunlight, candlesticks, and now electricity have allowed us to make use of time that would otherwise be filled with darkness. Each lighting installation revolves around a primary property of light. BLOSSOM is a collection of standing fixtures that work with the refraction and reflection of light. EFFULGENCE is a chandelier designed to propagate the light from a single bulb to illuminate an entire sphere. Both lighting pieces are meant to bring the focus back to a light source, exemplifying the intrinsic beauty in functional objects.

Bio

Sarah Hingley is an emerging glass maker. Her lighting designs focus either on the optic intricacies of glass through the use of clear glass or its ability to highlight subtlety through different hues of white. Variations in color density and the distribution of glass create lenses that emphasize the focus of each piece. The lighting installations are composed of multiple components that are caught in a state of flux, capturing the fluidity and flexibility of a system where the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Sarah is a junior and studies the use of art as therapy.

Elise Largesse

Statement

For OFF SEASON, I visited places defined by being peopled in those times when they were witnessed by nobody. What happens when we civilize a place, cut and structure it, make it purposed and then leave it purposeless? Our world continues to fill with our past recreations, our former havens, our seasonal places. Their altered existence is year-round; yet they are lucky if they get one season of human traction and noise. Places briefly overexposed to human contact are left more pointedly alone, and I feel lucky to know them then. Any year-round inhabitant of a summer seaside town knows this feeling of privilege, of a secret, of a knowing-better.

Bio

Elise Largesse is a writer and photographer living in New York City. She is a recent graduate of Gallatin, with a concentration in “Science, Religion, and Human Connection as Sources of Validation in the Face of the Unknown,” and a minor in creative writing. Focusing on the discomfort and the comfort of the unknown in both her writing and her artwork, she primarily writes fiction about science (not to be confused with science-fiction) with a focus on new physics, mortality, free will, very barely inhabited places, and science as its own means to religious feeling. She originally hails from Massachusetts, where she lived in the same room for her entire pre-Empire-State life.

Matthew Morocco

Statement

TO WHOM MUCH IS GIVEN, built with photographs of close friends and family, is a testament to my grandfather’s 2010 Thanksgiving toast, the first sincere words I ever heard him speak.

Bio

Matthew Morrocco spends his free time visiting his grandparents, whose luxurious home he hopes to one day appropriate. He looks for love in all the wrong places, except at home, and has yet to fully comprehend the value in wearing high-heeled shoes. He hopes to someday be the proud owner of a Cathedral, complete with high ceilings, atrophied relic and stained-glass windows. He lives and works in Manhattan with his messy yet lovable German Shepherd, Rosetta. He is currently represented by Cyr Morr Studio.

Amalyah Oren

Statement

STABILITY IN TRADITION: EGYPT Only two days before riots broke out in the streets of Cairo, I was visiting a small, rural secluded village just outside of the old Egyptian capital of Memphis. That day I learned about the ancient Egyptian craft of weaving. This village has built its name on the revival of Oriental rug weaving, an ancient tradition made new again only 40 years ago. Out of lack of industry and the need for economic stability, the people of Memphis took matters into their own hands to create the Oriental Carpet School, where students as young as 10 can attend after school and learn the meticulous craft of weaving. Each rug, made of fine silk, can take anywhere from several weeks to several months to complete. The most skilled weavers make the designs themselves and are able to complete a stitch per second, rarely needing to look at the design to know what to do next. This Oriental Carpet School, one of hundreds of its kind across Egypt, is a small example of successful entrepreneurship and economic stability in a country plagued by a struggling economy and instability.

Bio

Amalyah Oren is a junior studying art history and photography. Her interests lie in documentary photography and war art. She studied abroad in Berlin and spends her summers in Jerusalem.

Zooey Purdy

Statement

FRAMING THE ART is a participation-based arts project designed to inspire a new way of looking at technology, the Internet, and the browser. The browser serves as the frame, and the Internet as the tool for creating art. I am providing you with the frames and requesting that you produce the art. By using the Internet as the digital palette and the browser window as the artistic canvas, visitors to the Framing the Art site are able to experience web technology in new ways that allow for more critical thought and more understanding as to the scope of this medium’s power.

Bio

Zooey Purdy is a senior at Gallatin concentrating in “Interaction with Visual Media.” Her studies involve website design, studio art, digital art and media theory. She is also currently working as the website programmer and designer for NYLON Magazine.

Sheiva Rezvani

Statement

ANYWHERE BUT HERE is a part of the Master’s Thesis Work entitled, “In the Name of Science.” It consists of a three-part portrait series recreating photos from an instruction manual from the 1920s for “Healthy Vibratory Massage.” The original photos and instruction manual make no reference to the devices’ intended sexual purposes and instead attempt to convince the consumer of the healthy and hygienic benefits of using their product (i.e. to treat “neuralgia headaches” “weak eyesight” and “deafness”). For more information, including an in-depth history and original photos go to www. Artifacts and photoshoot location courtesy of the Museum of Sex.

Bio

Sheiva Rezvani is a new media artist, writer and graphic designer dedicated to smart visual solutions and to promoting feminism and progressive causes using new media technologies. She has worked and trained in digital media industries for ten years, starting with television broadcasting and editing, and eventually transitioning to design and photography. Sheiva’s professional experience in both new media and politics led her to recognize a lack of integration between them. She is currently using her research to bridge that gap while pursuing an MA in Gender Studies and New Media at NYU Gallatin. She is a feminist, a sociologist and a fan of satire who, by a remarkable chance, was named ‘Sheiva’ after a phrase in Farsi meaning eloquence and charm; a last minute change from being named ‘Banafsh’ meaning ‘purple.’

Libby Sills

Statement

JOEY SHAVING is a series of paintings focusing on ordinary people in everyday moments. Frequently based on low-resolution images from a cell phone camera, the portraits convey a sense of voyeurism, as the subjects are caught in moments that are both private and commonplace. The impetus for creating these works rose from the questions of what we are thinking and how we occupy ourselves mentally while performing our everyday motions.

Bio

Libby Sills is an artist from Providence, Rhode Island, who works in painting, sculpture and video. She is concentrating in visual art through Gallatin.

Matt So

Statement

FLIPBOOK: SERIES OF STILLS I am concerned with the way in which the use of digital media has sometimes been seen as a substitute for the experience of printed work. I feel that the two media should be considered qualitatively distinct, and that artistic work should be produced and consumed with consideration of these differences. We, as viewers, become collaborators in this process through our method of engagement, experience and appreciation of artworks. We are in the midst of a modern media revolution; just as the photograph proved distinct from painting, so will the digital medium establish its relationship to printed matter.

Bio

Matthew So is an undergraduate senior majoring in print media and publishing hailing from the San Francisco Bay Area. Suburbia, nostalgia and distance have been major influences in his work. Matthew is interested in the confrontational qualities of different media, the space they inhabit and the nature of our engagement with them. He is a hobbyist zine-maker, photographer, writer and daydreamer.

Soren Stockman

Statement

One limitation to the traditional reading of poetry is time: with WHO BORE THE BLAME?, the reader is in complete control of the individual experience of moving through the poem. Another limitation is space: a poem can be looked at as a visual object, a shape, a movement, and by existing as an object in space next to other works of art, a poem may be experienced in a more authentic way. The four poems presented in Who Bore the Blame?—named after a line from George Herbert’s “Love (III)”—are united both tonally and by a narrative thread.

Bio

Soren Stockman is a senior at Gallatin studying poetry and “the subjective truth” of feeling over fact. He’s also a performer on stage. He is from Boston, Massachusetts, and although he loves it, he doesn’t go back there very often.

Sarah Urbaez

Statement

FAMILY ALBUMS These photographs are chromomeric prints of my family and the spaces they inhabit. I wanted to document my cultural heritage and experience as a first generation American.

Bio

Sara Urbaez is a Gallatin student graduating in 2012.

Artists:

Jackson Bishop, Winston Chmielinksi, Hannah Daly, Hayden Dunham, Jacob Goldman, Tina Gong, Sarah Hingley, Elise Largesse, Matthew Morocco, Amalyah Oren, Zooey Purdy, Sheiva Rezvani, Libby Sills, Matt So, Soren Stockman, Sarah Urbaez